Run Report

Year         Total Calls for Service YTD            Fire Calls                   EMS Calls
2014                1625                                                450                            1175
2013                1501                                                300                            1201

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Eureka Fire District is supporting Breast Cancer Awareness Month through out October.
 
EFPD is selling Pink Tee Shirts to promote awareness through out October and all year long. Tee Shirts are $20.00 each, and proceeds are being donated to the Susan G. Komen Foundation .
 
 You may see Eureka Firefighters sporting a special tee shirt throughout October. FF's have a special blue tee shirt supporting breast cancer awareness that they will wear through out the month of October.
 
On October 25, 2014, 9am -3:30pm, Eureka Fire District working with the Eureka Wal-Greens is sponsoring the Mercy Wellness Bus to provide Breast Cancer screening. Mammograms will be available that morning. Walk-in's welcome, however scheduling your appointment is helpful.
Call 314-251-6300 to schedule your appointment.
 
The American Cancer Society suggests that Women over 40 have an annual mammogram and visit with their doctor or nurse yearly
 
 
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Tee Shirts available at EFPD; $20.00 each

Call 636-938-5505 to order.

Fire Prevention Month 2014

National Fire Prevention Week is October 5-11, 2014. Throughout the rest of the month the firefighters and paramedics of the Eureka Fire Protection District encourage everybody to take a few moments to review some critical fire safety measures, especially with children. The National Fire Protection Association's motto for this year is "Working Smoke Alarms Save Lives, Test Yours Evry Month."

 

Fast facts about fire

Home Fires

  • In 2011, U.S. fire departments responded to 370,000 home structure fires. These fires caused 13,910 civilian injuries, 2,520 civilian deaths, $6.9 billion in direct damage.
  • On average, seven people die in U.S. home fires per day.
  • Cooking is the leading cause home fires and home fire injuries, followed heating equipment. Smoking is a leading cause of civilian home fire deaths.
  • Most fatal fires kill one or two people. In 2011, 12 home fires killed five or more people resulting in a total of 67 deaths.

Cooking  

  • U.S. Fire Departments responded to an estimated annual average of 156,600 cooking-related fires between 2007-2011, resulting in 400 civilian deaths, 5,080 civilian injuries and $853  million in direct damage. 
  • Two of every five home fires start in the kitchen.
  • Unattended cooking was a factor in 34% of reported home cooking fires.
  • Two-thirds of home cooking fires started with ignition of food or other cooking materials. 
  • Ranges accounted for the 58% of home cooking fire incidents. Ovens accounted for 16%.
  • Children under five face a higher risk of non-fire burns associated with cooking than being burned in a cooking fire.
  • Microwave ovens are one of the leading home products associated with scald burn injuries not related to fires. Nearly half (44%) of the microwave oven injuries seen at emergency rooms in 2011 were scald burns.
  • Clothing was the item first ignited in less than 1% of home cooking fires, but these incidents accounted for 16% of the cooking fire deaths.

Heating

  • The leading factor contributing to heating equipment fires was failure to clean, principally creosote from solid fueled heating equipment, primarily chimneys.
  • Portable or fixed space heaters, including wood stoves, were involved in one-third (32%) of home heating fires and four out of five (80%) home heating deaths.
  • Half of home heating fire deaths resulted from fires caused by heating equipment too close to things that can burn, such as upholstered furniture, clothing, mattresses or bedding.
  • In most years, heating is the second leading cause of home fires, fire deaths, and fire injuries. Fixed or portable space heaters are involved in about 4 out of 5 heating fire deaths.

Smoking Materials

  • During 2007-2011 smoking materials caused an estimated 17,900 home structure fires, resulting in 580 deaths, 1,280 injuries and $509 million in direct property damage, per year.
  • Sleep was a factor in one-third of the home smoking material fire deaths.
  • Possible alcohol impairment was a factor in one in five of home smoking fire deaths.  
  • In recent years, Canada and the United States have required that all cigarettes sold must be “fire safe,” that is have reduced ignition strength and less likely to start fires.

Electrical

  • About half (49%) of home electrical fires involved electrical distribution or lighting equipment. Other leading types of equipment were washer or dryer, fan, portable or stationary space heater, air conditioning equipment water heater and range.
  • Electrical failure or malfunctions caused an average of almost 50,000 home fires per year, resulting in roughly 450 deaths and $1.5 billion in direct property damage.  

Candles

  • During 2007-2011 candles caused 3% of home fires, 4% of home fire deaths, 7% of home fire injuries and 6% of direct property damage from home fires.
  • On average, there are 32 home candle fires reported per day.
  • Roughly one-third of these fires started in the bedroom; however, the candle industry found that only 13% of candle users burn candles in the bedroom most often.

Fire Prevention Week Video Link for Kids!

Kitchen Fire Safety Rules

Red Shirt Friday

Red Shirt Friday – Support Our Troops

 
Eureka Fire District is showing our support for the troops overseas by wearing and selling Red Tee Shirts.
EFPD Staff have the option to wear these tee shirts on Fridays and encourage others to also participate.
We are selling shirts to support the troops and the profits are being donated to the FOCUS Marine Foundation (  https://focusmarinesfoundation.org/)
and the Special Forces Casualty Fund (http://www.stlouisgreenberets.com/index.html )
 
Shirts are available for purchase for $20.00 each at EFPD Station # 1, 4849 Highway 109, Eureka

 

Memorial Pavers

 

Please click here to print this form.

Guns and Hoses Boxing November 26th

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Get Your Tickets for Guns and Hoses!

 

Tickets are available now at the Eureka Fire Protection District.

Tickets ar $25 and $35.00

You can also get tickets for the November 26 th, 2014 by contacting

Ticket Hotline     St. Louis and Adjoining Counties   314-713-6031 or 314-560-9226

Heating Safety

 There is something about the winter months and curling up
with a good book by the fireplace. But did you know that heating
equipment is a leading cause of home fire deaths? With a few simple safety tips and precautions you can prevent most heating fires from happening
.

 

FACT

Half of home heating fires are reported during the months of 
December, January, and February.

 

Heating Equipment Smarts

Install wood burning stoves following
manufacturer’s instructions or have a professional do the
installation. All fuel-burning equipment should be vented
to the outside to avoid carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning.

 If you smell gas in your gas heater, do not light the
appliance. Leave the home immediately
and call your local fire department or gas company.

 
Have a three-foot “kid-free zone”
around open fires and space heaters.
 
Never use your oven to heat your home.
 
Have heating equipment and chimneys
inspected every year by a qualified professional.
 
Have a qualified professional install stationary
space heating equipment, water heaters or central
heating equipment according to the local codes
and manufacturer’s instructions.
 
Remember to turn portable heaters off when
leaving the room or going to bed.
 
Always use the right kind of fuel, specified by the
manufacturer, for fuel burning space heaters.
 
Make sure the fireplace has a sturdy screen to stop
sparks from flying into the room. Ashes should be
cool before putting them in a metal container. Keep
the container a safe distance away from your home.
 
Test smoke alarms monthly!

 

 

Mourning Loss of FF/EMT-P Greg Light

The Family, Friends, Officers, Chiefs, Staff and Board of Directors of Eureka Fire Protection District would like to express our sincerest  appreciation to the citizens and businesses of our Fire District and Entire Community, as well as to all of our brothers and sisters in all emergency services for the innumerable expressions of sympathy and kindness shown to us and the family of Firefighter Greg Light in the past weeks.

Thank You All So Much!!

 

Donations for the Greg Light Family can be sent to: Responder Rescue

Checks should be made out to: Responder Rescue in care of the Greg Light Family

                                                           

                                                           Responder Rescue                          
                                                            3711 Mexico Rd
                                                            St. Charles, MO 63303
                                                            314-627-0700

                                                  http://www.responderrescue.org/

 

Eureka Fire District has produced a commemorative Challenge Coin remembering Greg Light.

Proceeds from this coin will be put in the “Greg Light Family Fund “with Responder Rescue.

The cost of the coin is $5. You can get coins at the Eureka Fire Protection District Administrative office M-F 0800-1630 or contact Greg Brown, Shawn Merry, Kyle Brown or Scott Kavanagh. If you have any questions call 636-938-5505.

Or you can contact us at the “Contact Us” link on the EFPD web page,  http://www.efpd.org/contacts.php

 
 
 

Exposing an Invisible Killer:

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The Dangers of Carbon Monoxide

Each year in America, unintentional carbon monoxide poisoning claims more than 400 lives and sends another 20,000 people to hospital emergency rooms for treatment.
The United States Fire Administration (USFA) and the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) would like you to know that there are simple steps you can take to protect yourself from deadly carbon monoxide fumes.
Understanding the Risk
What is carbon monoxide?
Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless and toxic gas. Because it is impossible to see, taste or smell the toxic fumes, CO can kill you before you are aware it is in your home. At lower levels of exposure, CO causes mild effects that are often mistaken for the flu. These symptoms include headaches, dizziness, disorientation, nausea and fatigue. The effects of CO exposure can vary greatly from person to person depending on age, overall health and the concentration and length of exposure.
Where does carbon monoxide come from?
CO gas can come from several sources: gas-fired appliances, charcoal grills, wood-burning furnaces or fireplaces and motor vehicles.
Who is at risk?
Everyone is at risk for CO poisoning. Medical experts believe that unborn babies, infants, children, senior citizens and people with heart or lung problems are at even greater risk for CO poisoning.
What Actions Do I Take if My Carbon Monoxide Alarm Goes Off?
What you need to do if your carbon monoxide alarm goes off depends on whether anyone is feeling ill or not.
If no one is feeling ill:
1.   Silence the alarm.
2.   Turn off all appliances and sources of combustion (i.e. furnace and fireplace).
3.   Ventilate the house with fresh air by opening doors and windows.
4.   Call a qualified professional to investigate the source of the possible CO buildup.
If illness is a factor:
1.   Evacuate all occupants immediately.
2.   Determine how many occupants are ill and determine their symptoms.
3.   Call your 911 and when relaying information to the dispatcher, include the number of people feeling ill.
4.   Do not re-enter the home without the approval of a fire department representative.
5.   Call a qualified professional to repair the source of the CO.
Protect Yourself and Your Family from CO Poisoning

Install at least one carbon monoxide alarm with an audible warning signal near the sleeping areas and outside individual bedrooms. Make sure the alarm has been evaluated by a nationally recognized laboratory, such as Underwriters Laboratories (UL). Carbon monoxide alarms measure levels of CO over time and are designed to sound an alarm before an average, healthy adult would experience symptoms. It is very possible that you may not be experiencing symptoms when you hear the alarm. This does not mean that CO is not present.

Have a qualified professional check all fuel burning appliances, furnaces, venting and chimney systems at least once a year.

Never use your range or oven to help heat your home and never use a charcoal grill or hibachi in your home or garage.

Never keep a car running in a garage. Even if the garage doors are open, normal circulation will not provide enough fresh air to reliably prevent a dangerous buildup of CO.

When purchasing an existing home, have a qualified technician evaluate the integrity of the heating and cooking systems, as well as the sealed spaces between the garage and house. The presence of a carbon monoxide alarm in your home can save your life in the event of CO buildup.

Help Prevent Wildfires!

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Help prevent wildfires!

A combination of strong winds, low humidity, dry conditions, and warming temperatures this time of year has the potential to create explosive wildfires. The main cause of wildfires is improper burning of debris such as trash and brush piles. Please help prevent wildfires!

The Missouri Department of Conservation urges people not to conduct outdoor burning during times when grasses, brush and other fire fuel are very dry, humidity is low and weather is windy. Check with local fire departments regarding burn bans that may be in place. Call 911 at the first sign of a fire getting out of control and help stop arson by calling Operation Forest Arson at 800-392-1111. For more info on wildfire prevention, visit http://mdc.mo.gov/node/27217

or Contact the Eureka Fire Protection District at 636-938-5505

 DID YOU KNOW:

  • Each year MDC staff work with numerous fire departments around the state to help suppress thousands of wildfires.
  • In cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, MDC provided more than $354,000 in grants to 182 volunteer fire departments last year for protective clothing, equipment, and training.
  • The Department also obtained more than $5 million in equipment last year from federal government programs for volunteer fire departments in the state, and provided wildland fire-suppression training to more than 400 Missouri firefighters.  

MDC Forester Sam Jewett stands on the bulldozer he uses to fight forest fires.

 

MDC Forester Sam Jewett

 

Open Burning

smokey.jpgDuring the spring and summer months in the St. Louis Area, we have many days of high temperatures, strong winds, and low humidity. These factors and intermittent rainfall can lead to dangerous grass and brush fires.

Per Missouri Department of Natural Resources Regulations-

St. Louis Metropolitan Area: Open burning of trees, tree leaves or brush is allowed only in areas outside of incorporated municipalities from Sept. 16 to April 14 of each calendar year.  These brush piles are limited to a base of 16 square feet and the burning is allowed from 10 a.m. through 4 p.m..

We always ask that Eureka Fire Protection District residents contact Engine House 1 at 636-938-5505 before burning so we may know about it first. Eureka Fire Protection District does not issue burn or bonfire permits, but we may advise you not to burn at any particular time due to conditions.

For more information, you can download a hotsheet with safety tips and state and local regulatory rules on open burning.