Run Report

Year         Total Calls for Service YTD            Fire Calls                   EMS Calls
2014                1445                                                401                            1044
2013                1328                                                268                            1060

Requests for Proposals and Bids

efpd.gifThe Eureka Fire Protection District is actively seeking  RFP for

Two (2) Ambulances

Vendors and interested parties may visit our RFP's / Specifications section for more information.

Bids are due by 4:30 pm, Tuesday, October 14, 2014.

Smoke and CO Detector Recall

Please click below for more information:

Kidde Recalls Smoke and Combination Smoke/CO Alarms Due to Alarm Failure

CERT Class Begins September 15, 2014

certstl250.gifThe Eureka Emergency Management Agency, Eureka Fire District, & Eureka Police Department and will conduct a CERT training program begining September 15, 2014 and running 4 weeks on Monday evenings. Finishing on Saturday, October 11, 2014

Community Emergency Response Team (C.E.R.T.) is made up of volunteers that have completed a course of study outlined by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and Department of Homeland Security (DHS). These volunteers would then help public safety organizations within the community if a disaster strikes. On-going training for the volunteers will also be offered to keep them prepared.

Following a major disaster, first responders who provide fire and medical services may not be able to meet the demand for these services. Factors such as number of victims, communication failures, and road blockages can prevent people from accessing emergency services they have come to expect at a moment's notice through 911. People will have to rely on each other for help in order to meet their immediate life saving and life sustaining needs. This training will help those citizens and their neighbors to help themselves and neighborhood.

To register Click Here!
 

Red Shirt Friday

Red Shirt Friday – Support Our Troops

 
Eureka Fire District is showing our support for the troops overseas by wearing and selling Red Tee Shirts.
EFPD Staff have the option to wear these tee shirts on Fridays and encourage others to also participate.
We are selling shirts to support the troops and the profits are being donated to the FOCUS Marine Foundation (  https://focusmarinesfoundation.org/)
and the Special Forces Casualty Fund (http://www.stlouisgreenberets.com/index.html )
 
Shirts are available for purchase for $20.00 each at EFPD Station # 1, 4849 Highway 109, Eureka

 

Memorial Pavers

 

Please click here to print this form.

Donít be Left in the Dark

Blackouts are always a possibility, even when severe storms or other disasters haven't found their way into your area, and power outages are not uncommon during the summer months.  Here are a few helpful tips on what you can do before and during a blackout:

  • Make sure you have an emergency toolkit and a family communications plan! Your toolkit should contain basic short-term survival materials, like bottled water and non-perishable goods.
  • Tape the refrigerator and freezer door to prevent opening and keep your perishable food fresh for as long as possible. Throw away any food that has been exposed to 40° F temperatures for more than two hours.
  • If the blackout isn't storm related, make use of this time outdoors with family and friends!
  • Keep non-electrical entertainment on hand, such as board games and charades to make time pass more quickly (this is especially helpful with children).
  • Make sure to keep a camp stove and a stockpile of flashlights handy in case the blackout runs longer than expected.
  • Be prepared for extended outages and keep a full tank of gas and a full cellphone battery.
  • Maintain a positive attitude! This is essential in any emergency situation. 

For more information on how to prepare for blackouts, you can visit the American Red Cross, and also check out these other useful blackout tips!

Myth Busting Lightning!

"If there's lightning, lay down flat on the ground! Seek shelter under a tree! And don't touch someone who's been struck or you'll get shocked!" How many lightning myths have you heard?

The truth is if you lay down on the ground, you're more exposed to electrical currents running underground! Never seek shelter from lightning under a tree. It is actually the second leading cause of lightning fatalities! And if someone is struck by lightning, don't be scared to assist him or her immediately. The human body does not store electricity, and helping them immediately could be essential to their survival!

Before you go out in the rain, it is crucial to know your facts.

  • Lightning often strikes the same place repeatedly, especially if it’s a tall, pointy, isolated object. 
  • Most cars are safe from lightning, but it is the metal roof and metal sides that protect you, NOT the rubber tires.
  • A house is a safe place to be during a thunderstorm as long as you avoid anything that conducts electricity.
  • Height, pointy shape, and isolation are the dominant factors controlling where a lightning bolt will strike. The presence of metal makes absolutely no difference on where lightning strikes.

Keep yourself and others safe by being lighting aware. Lightning Safety Week begins June 22! For more information on lightning, visit the NOAA lightning page. And for thunderstorm safety tips visit the http://www.ready.gov/thunderstorms-lightning.

NOAA lightning page. And for thunderstorm safety tips visit the http://www.ready.gov/thunderstorms-lightning.

Mourning Loss of FF/EMT-P Greg Light

The Family, Friends, Officers, Chiefs, Staff and Board of Directors of Eureka Fire Protection District would like to express our sincerest  appreciation to the citizens and businesses of our Fire District and Entire Community, as well as to all of our brothers and sisters in all emergency services for the innumerable expressions of sympathy and kindness shown to us and the family of Firefighter Greg Light in the past weeks.

Thank You All So Much!!

 

Donations for the Greg Light Family can be sent to: Responder Rescue

Checks should be made out to: Responder Rescue in care of the Greg Light Family

                                                           

                                                           Responder Rescue                          
                                                            3711 Mexico Rd
                                                            St. Charles, MO 63303
                                                            314-627-0700

                                                  http://www.responderrescue.org/

 

Eureka Fire District has produced a commemorative Challenge Coin remembering Greg Light.

Proceeds from this coin will be put in the “Greg Light Family Fund “with Responder Rescue.

The cost of the coin is $5. You can get coins at the Eureka Fire Protection District Administrative office M-F 0800-1630 or contact Greg Brown, Shawn Merry, Kyle Brown or Scott Kavanagh. If you have any questions call 636-938-5505.

Or you can contact us at the “Contact Us” link on the EFPD web page,  http://www.efpd.org/contacts.php

 
 
 

Exposing an Invisible Killer:

co2_safety.jpg

 

 

 

The Dangers of Carbon Monoxide

Each year in America, unintentional carbon monoxide poisoning claims more than 400 lives and sends another 20,000 people to hospital emergency rooms for treatment.
The United States Fire Administration (USFA) and the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) would like you to know that there are simple steps you can take to protect yourself from deadly carbon monoxide fumes.
Understanding the Risk
What is carbon monoxide?
Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless and toxic gas. Because it is impossible to see, taste or smell the toxic fumes, CO can kill you before you are aware it is in your home. At lower levels of exposure, CO causes mild effects that are often mistaken for the flu. These symptoms include headaches, dizziness, disorientation, nausea and fatigue. The effects of CO exposure can vary greatly from person to person depending on age, overall health and the concentration and length of exposure.
Where does carbon monoxide come from?
CO gas can come from several sources: gas-fired appliances, charcoal grills, wood-burning furnaces or fireplaces and motor vehicles.
Who is at risk?
Everyone is at risk for CO poisoning. Medical experts believe that unborn babies, infants, children, senior citizens and people with heart or lung problems are at even greater risk for CO poisoning.
What Actions Do I Take if My Carbon Monoxide Alarm Goes Off?
What you need to do if your carbon monoxide alarm goes off depends on whether anyone is feeling ill or not.
If no one is feeling ill:
1.   Silence the alarm.
2.   Turn off all appliances and sources of combustion (i.e. furnace and fireplace).
3.   Ventilate the house with fresh air by opening doors and windows.
4.   Call a qualified professional to investigate the source of the possible CO buildup.
If illness is a factor:
1.   Evacuate all occupants immediately.
2.   Determine how many occupants are ill and determine their symptoms.
3.   Call your 911 and when relaying information to the dispatcher, include the number of people feeling ill.
4.   Do not re-enter the home without the approval of a fire department representative.
5.   Call a qualified professional to repair the source of the CO.
Protect Yourself and Your Family from CO Poisoning

Install at least one carbon monoxide alarm with an audible warning signal near the sleeping areas and outside individual bedrooms. Make sure the alarm has been evaluated by a nationally recognized laboratory, such as Underwriters Laboratories (UL). Carbon monoxide alarms measure levels of CO over time and are designed to sound an alarm before an average, healthy adult would experience symptoms. It is very possible that you may not be experiencing symptoms when you hear the alarm. This does not mean that CO is not present.

Have a qualified professional check all fuel burning appliances, furnaces, venting and chimney systems at least once a year.

Never use your range or oven to help heat your home and never use a charcoal grill or hibachi in your home or garage.

Never keep a car running in a garage. Even if the garage doors are open, normal circulation will not provide enough fresh air to reliably prevent a dangerous buildup of CO.

When purchasing an existing home, have a qualified technician evaluate the integrity of the heating and cooking systems, as well as the sealed spaces between the garage and house. The presence of a carbon monoxide alarm in your home can save your life in the event of CO buildup.

Fire Hydrant Flow Testing

Hydrant_Flow.jpg 

 
The Eureka Fire Protection District conducts Fire Hydrant Flow Testing throughout the Fire District from March 1 through November 1 each year.
 
Neighborhood notifications are accomplished by placement of signs at intersections at the entrance of the affected neighborhoods at least 2 weeks prior to commencement of the testing.
  

Testing in September 2014 will be in the following neighborhoods and streets:
 
The Legends 
 
While flowing increased amounts of water during the test, agitation of existing minerals and sediments may produce slight discoloration in the water.
 
This discoloration is not harmful and will dissipate within a short time. Thank you in advance for your patience during this important testing.
 
 
Hydrant_Pitot.jpg

 

Help Prevent Wildfires!

MDC Header

Help prevent wildfires!

A combination of strong winds, low humidity, dry conditions, and warming temperatures this time of year has the potential to create explosive wildfires. The main cause of wildfires is improper burning of debris such as trash and brush piles. Please help prevent wildfires!

The Missouri Department of Conservation urges people not to conduct outdoor burning during times when grasses, brush and other fire fuel are very dry, humidity is low and weather is windy. Check with local fire departments regarding burn bans that may be in place. Call 911 at the first sign of a fire getting out of control and help stop arson by calling Operation Forest Arson at 800-392-1111. For more info on wildfire prevention, visit http://mdc.mo.gov/node/27217

or Contact the Eureka Fire Protection District at 636-938-5505

 DID YOU KNOW:

  • Each year MDC staff work with numerous fire departments around the state to help suppress thousands of wildfires.
  • In cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, MDC provided more than $354,000 in grants to 182 volunteer fire departments last year for protective clothing, equipment, and training.
  • The Department also obtained more than $5 million in equipment last year from federal government programs for volunteer fire departments in the state, and provided wildland fire-suppression training to more than 400 Missouri firefighters.  

MDC Forester Sam Jewett stands on the bulldozer he uses to fight forest fires.

 

MDC Forester Sam Jewett

 

Open Burning

smokey.jpgDuring the spring and summer months in the St. Louis Area, we have many days of high temperatures, strong winds, and low humidity. These factors and intermittent rainfall can lead to dangerous grass and brush fires.

Per Missouri Department of Natural Resources Regulations-

St. Louis Metropolitan Area: Open burning of trees, tree leaves or brush is allowed only in areas outside of incorporated municipalities from Sept. 16 to April 14 of each calendar year.  These brush piles are limited to a base of 16 square feet and the burning is allowed from 10 a.m. through 4 p.m..

We always ask that Eureka Fire Protection District residents contact Engine House 1 at 636-938-5505 before burning so we may know about it first. Eureka Fire Protection District does not issue burn or bonfire permits, but we may advise you not to burn at any particular time due to conditions.

For more information, you can download a hotsheet with safety tips and state and local regulatory rules on open burning.