Run Report

Year         Total Calls for Service YTD            Fire Calls                   EMS Calls
2014                2088                                                569                            1519
2013                1937                                                401                            1536

Home Makeover: Winter Edition

Just as you would add winter care items to your emergency kit to prepare for the upcoming season, your home can also use a winter makeover. Properly preparing your home for cold temperatures can keep you safe and warm, and lower your energy costs. Here are a few tips to follow as the mercury plunges:

Get in the energy saving spirit by conducting a home energy assessment. See how much energy your home consumes and evaluate what measures you can take to make your home more energy efficient. Then, check out “12 Days of Energy Savings” from the U.S. Department of Energy to learn how to stay warm while saving money this winter.

After you prepare your home for winter weather, visit America’s PrepareAthon! for ways to prepare your family!

Exposing an Invisible Killer:

co2_safety.jpg

 

 

 

The Dangers of Carbon Monoxide

Each year in America, unintentional carbon monoxide poisoning claims more than 400 lives and sends another 20,000 people to hospital emergency rooms for treatment.
The United States Fire Administration (USFA) and the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) would like you to know that there are simple steps you can take to protect yourself from deadly carbon monoxide fumes.
Understanding the Risk
What is carbon monoxide?
Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless and toxic gas. Because it is impossible to see, taste or smell the toxic fumes, CO can kill you before you are aware it is in your home. At lower levels of exposure, CO causes mild effects that are often mistaken for the flu. These symptoms include headaches, dizziness, disorientation, nausea and fatigue. The effects of CO exposure can vary greatly from person to person depending on age, overall health and the concentration and length of exposure.
Where does carbon monoxide come from?
CO gas can come from several sources: gas-fired appliances, charcoal grills, wood-burning furnaces or fireplaces and motor vehicles.
Who is at risk?
Everyone is at risk for CO poisoning. Medical experts believe that unborn babies, infants, children, senior citizens and people with heart or lung problems are at even greater risk for CO poisoning.
What Actions Do I Take if My Carbon Monoxide Alarm Goes Off?
What you need to do if your carbon monoxide alarm goes off depends on whether anyone is feeling ill or not.
If no one is feeling ill:
1.   Silence the alarm.
2.   Turn off all appliances and sources of combustion (i.e. furnace and fireplace).
3.   Ventilate the house with fresh air by opening doors and windows.
4.   Call a qualified professional to investigate the source of the possible CO buildup.
If illness is a factor:
1.   Evacuate all occupants immediately.
2.   Determine how many occupants are ill and determine their symptoms.
3.   Call your 911 and when relaying information to the dispatcher, include the number of people feeling ill.
4.   Do not re-enter the home without the approval of a fire department representative.
5.   Call a qualified professional to repair the source of the CO.
Protect Yourself and Your Family from CO Poisoning

Install at least one carbon monoxide alarm with an audible warning signal near the sleeping areas and outside individual bedrooms. Make sure the alarm has been evaluated by a nationally recognized laboratory, such as Underwriters Laboratories (UL). Carbon monoxide alarms measure levels of CO over time and are designed to sound an alarm before an average, healthy adult would experience symptoms. It is very possible that you may not be experiencing symptoms when you hear the alarm. This does not mean that CO is not present.

Have a qualified professional check all fuel burning appliances, furnaces, venting and chimney systems at least once a year.

Never use your range or oven to help heat your home and never use a charcoal grill or hibachi in your home or garage.

Never keep a car running in a garage. Even if the garage doors are open, normal circulation will not provide enough fresh air to reliably prevent a dangerous buildup of CO.

When purchasing an existing home, have a qualified technician evaluate the integrity of the heating and cooking systems, as well as the sealed spaces between the garage and house. The presence of a carbon monoxide alarm in your home can save your life in the event of CO buildup.

Memorial Pavers

 

Please click here to print this form.

Red Shirt Friday

Red Shirt Friday – Support Our Troops

 
Eureka Fire District is showing our support for the troops overseas by wearing and selling Red Tee Shirts.
EFPD Staff have the option to wear these tee shirts on Fridays and encourage others to also participate.
We are selling shirts to support the troops and the profits are being donated to the FOCUS Marine Foundation (  https://focusmarinesfoundation.org/)
and the Special Forces Casualty Fund (http://www.stlouisgreenberets.com/index.html )
 
Shirts are available for purchase for $20.00 each at EFPD Station # 1, 4849 Highway 109, Eureka

 

Staying Safe When Outdoors, Cold Weather

Many of us are entering the coldest time of the year. Cold temperatures make your body lose heat faster than it can be produced. This condition results in abnormally low body temperature, also known as hypothermia.
Hypothermia affects the brain, leaving the victim unable to think clearly or move well. This inability makes hypothermia particularly dangerous because a person may not know it’s happening. Victims of hypothermia are often:
  • Seniors with inadequate heating, food or clothing;
  • Babies sleeping in cold rooms; and
  • People who remain outdoors for long periods like the homeless, hikers or hunters.
 
In extreme cold, make outside trips as brief as possible to protect your health and safety. However, if you must be outside take a few special precautions:
  • Dress warmly and in layers.  A waterproof jacket will help you stay warm and dry if it starts to snow;
  • Work slowly if you have to do heavy outdoor chores; and
  • Notify friends and family where you will be before you go hiking, camping or skiing.
Do not ignore shivering. It is an important first sign that the body is losing heat. Learn the other signs of hypothermia and how to care for someone who may be suffering from it before your next outdoor winter excursion.

Mourning Loss of FF/EMT-P Greg Light

The Family, Friends, Officers, Chiefs, Staff and Board of Directors of Eureka Fire Protection District would like to express our sincerest  appreciation to the citizens and businesses of our Fire District and Entire Community, as well as to all of our brothers and sisters in all emergency services for the innumerable expressions of sympathy and kindness shown to us and the family of Firefighter Greg Light in the past weeks.

Thank You All So Much!!

 

Donations for the Greg Light Family can be sent to: Responder Rescue

Checks should be made out to: Responder Rescue in care of the Greg Light Family

                                                           

                                                           Responder Rescue                          
                                                            3711 Mexico Rd
                                                            St. Charles, MO 63303
                                                            314-627-0700

                                                  http://www.responderrescue.org/

 

Eureka Fire District has produced a commemorative Challenge Coin remembering Greg Light.

Proceeds from this coin will be put in the “Greg Light Family Fund “with Responder Rescue.

The cost of the coin is $5. You can get coins at the Eureka Fire Protection District Administrative office M-F 0800-1630 or contact Greg Brown, Shawn Merry, Kyle Brown or Scott Kavanagh. If you have any questions call 636-938-5505.

Or you can contact us at the “Contact Us” link on the EFPD web page,  http://www.efpd.org/contacts.php